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Canine Parvovirus (CPV): Symptoms, Prevention, and Diagnosis

Canine Parvovirus (CPV): Symptoms, Prevention, and Diagnosis

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  • Time of issue:2023-11-15 18:58
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(Summary description)

Canine Parvovirus (CPV): Symptoms, Prevention, and Diagnosis

(Summary description)

  • Categories:News & Events
  • Author:
  • Origin:
  • Time of issue:2023-11-15 18:58
  • Views:
Information

Canine Parvovirus (CPV) is a highly contagious viral infection that affects dogs, particularly puppies between six and 20 weeks old. CPV primarily targets the gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow of dogs, leading to severe and often fatal symptoms.

 

 

 

 

Clinical Symptoms

  • Enteritis Type: Dogs get infected by licking contaminated feces, soil, or objects carrying canine parvovirus. Early symptoms may include mild gastrointestinal signs such as loss of appetite, progressing to severe vomiting and hemorrhagic diarrhea. The progression from mild to severe symptoms typically does not exceed two days, and the entire course of the disease generally does not exceed one week.
  • Myocarditis Type: Usually observed in puppies under 4-6 weeks of age, often without any warning signs or just mild diarrhea. This type can lead to respiratory and cardiovascular failure in puppies, resulting in death within a few hours. The mortality rate for this disease, without treatment after infection, can reach 91%.

 

Preventive Measures

  • Regular Vaccination: Canine parvovirus vaccine is one of the most effective means of preventing the infection. Puppies can receive their first vaccine at 8 weeks of age, with subsequent doses administered every 3-4 weeks for total three doses. After completing the initial immunization, an annual vaccine is necessary to maintain the dog's immunity.
  • Avoid Contact with Infected Dogs: Try to prevent your own dog from contact with dogs already infected with canine parvovirus to avoid viral transmission.
  • Maintain Hygiene: Keep your dog's living environment clean by regular disinfection to reduce the spread of the virus. Additionally, keep your dog away from unclean food and water sources.
  • Scientific Feeding: Ensure a balanced diet for your dog, avoiding feeding them oily, high-protein, and high-fat foods to prevent gastrointestinal diseases. Regular deworming, check-ups, and timely identification and treatment of health issues are also important.

 

Diagnostic Methods

 

Current Diagnostic Methods: There are two main methods for testing the presence of CPV. The most common and convenient method is the fecal ELISA test (ELISA stands for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). It can be completed by a veterinarian in around 15 minutes. While the ELISA test is usually accurate, it can occasionally yield false positive or false negative results, so further testing for confirmation is necessary. Another method is the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. While PCR test is highly accurate, it requires sending a fecal sample to a specialized laboratory for PCR-based testing, taking much more time than ELISA and possibly resulting in delayed treatment.

 

Pluslife CPV Test: Based on self-patented RHAM technology, Pluslife CPV test provides PCR-level accurate results within 30 minutes, combining the rapidness of the ELISA test and the accuracy of PCR test. It significantly reduces the result-waiting time of the PCR test and allows for timely treatment and increased chances of recovery. Also, Pluslife CPV test is affordable and user-friendly, requiring only three steps and 1-2 minutes of hands-on time. This makes it particularly suitable for veterinary clinics or pet owners.

 

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